Every Raptor Ever

Listed: We ranked every player to ever play for the Toronto Raptors

by    October 26, 2015

This list was based on a mixed methodology combining WinShares, overall impact of contribution, number of games played, points per game, the recontextualization of past events, as well as biased and unresearched qualitative analysis; based on accomplishments (or lack there of) made solely to the Toronto Raptors up to the end of September of 2015.

196. Rafael Araújo – 2004–06, 111 games, -0.6 win shares; was drafted over Andre Iguodala and Josh Smith
195. Art Long – 2002-03, 7 games, -0.3 ws; was actively bad over 7 games to achieve -0.3 win shares
194. Damone Brown – 2002-03, 5 g, -0.2 ws
193. Sharone Wright – 2009-10, 78 g, -1.2 ws; the single worst win shares of any Raptor, twice as bad as the second worst ever…
192. Lindsey Hunter – 2002-03, 29 g, -0.6 ws; won NBA titles the year before and after his lone Raptor season

Andrea Bargnani – 2006-13, 433 games, 16.3 ws

Let’s throw Andrea Bargnani (2006-13, 433 games, 16.3 ws) under the bus. There were some lean years in Toronto in terms of wins, but there had always been support for the team. There was culpable excitement for something happen with this team. He was selected with the only 1st overall pick in 2006 — the only time in Raptors’ franchise history they’ve had it — ahead of LeMarcus Aldridge (2), Brandon Roy (6), Rajan Rondo (21) and 57 other players that are not Andrea Barnani. We were promised Dirk Nowitzki but got pasta commercials. In his 5th season he would be scoring 21.4 point per game, but at 7’0″ his 4.8 rebounds per game is 31st among Raptors. (Kyle Lowry, 6’0″, is 34th at 4.7 rpg.) He is 2nd in 3-point attempts and 38th in percentage (.361). He played 433 games for the Raptors and ALL of them were frustrating.

190. Roko Ukić – 2008-09, 72 g, -0.4 ws
189. Vincenzo Esposito – 1995-96, 30 g, -0.6 ws
188. Chris Jeffries – 2002-03, 53 g, -0.5 ws
187. Chris Gamer – 1997-97, 38 g, -0.4 ws
186. Aleksandar Radojević – 1999-00, 3 g, -0.1; was drafted over Manu Ginobili, Ron Artest (Metta World Peace) and Andre Kirilenko
185. D.J. Augustin – 2013, 10 g, -0.2 ws
184. Jake Voshkuhl – 2008-09, 38 g, -0.3 ws;
183. Greg Foster – 2002-03, 29 g, -0.3 ws
182. Tyrone Corbin – 2001-01, 15 g, -0.3 ws; currently the interim coach of the Utah Jazz
181. Rasual Butler – 2011-12, 34 g, -0.2 ws

180. Andre Barrett – 2006, 17 g, -0.2 ws
179. Hassan Adams – 2009, 12 g, -0.2 ws
178. Jannero Pargo – 2004, 5 g, -0.2 ws
177. Dion Glover – 2004, 14 g, -0.1 ws

176-HEDO

Hedo Turkoglu (2006-13, 433 games, 16.3 ws): Ball. Pizza Pizza. Night Clubs. Those aren’t the first three things that should define your short time on a new team. Turkoglu was positioned as the figurehead of the multi-cultural movement under Bryan Colangelo and was lavished with a 5-year, $53 million contract. He was traded almost a calendar year later for Leandro Barbosa (#34) and Dwayne Jones. (Fun Fact: Hedo and Vince Carter swapped teams in December 2010 in a trade that also involved Gilbert Arenas, Rashard Lewis, Mickael Pietrus (#74), Jason Richardson, Marcin Gortat and Earl Clark.) — Mitch Orsatti
 
We need to remember that Hedo once starred in a TV commercial where he ignored his coach and ate pizza. — Mark Milner

175. Justin Dentmon – 2012, 4 g, -0.1 ws
174. Sundiata Gaines – 2011, 6 g, -01. ws
173. Roy Rogers – 1998, 6 g, -0.1 ws; played for both Vancouver and Toronto
172. Brad Lohaus – 1996, 6 g, -0.1 ws; was nicknamed “Big Bird”
171. Michael Williams – 1998-99, 2 g, -0.1 ws

170. Linton Johnson – 2008, 2 g, -0.1 ws
169. Trey Johnson – 2011, 7 g, -0.1 ws
168. Negele Knight – 1998-99, 6 g, -0.1 ws
167. Nathan Jawai – 2009, 6 g, -0.1 ws
166. Tim Kempton – 1997-98, 5 g, -0.1 ws
165. Bruno Caboclo – 2014-, 8 g, -0.1 ws
164. Jimmy Oliver – 1996-97, 4 g, -0.1 ws
163. Bob McCann – 1997-98, 1 g, 0.0 ws; scored zero points in one appearance
162. William Cunningham – 1999, 1 g, 0.0 ws; scored zero points in one appearance
161. Mark Baker – 1998-99, 1 g, 0.0 ws; scored zero points in one appearance

160. Herb Williams – 1996, 1 g, 0.0 ws; lasted just five days with Toronto
159. Lucas Nogueira – 2014-, 6 g, 0.0 ws
158. Garth Joseph – 2000-01, 2 g, 0.0 ws; his first name is “Garth”
157. Zendon Hamilton – 2003, 3 g, 0.0 ws
156. Ronald Dupree – 2010-11, 3 g, 0.0 ws
155. Rick Brunson – 2003, 3 g, 0.0 ws
154. Ed Stokes – 1997-98, 4 g, 0.0 ws; signed by five teams but only ever played in Toronto
153. Dan O’Sullivan – 1995-96, 5 g, 0.0 ws
152. Antonio Lang – 1999-00, 7 g, 0.0 ws
151. Austin Daye – 2013-14, 8 g, 0.0 ws

150. Dwayne Whitfield – 1995-96, 8 g, 0.0 ws
149. Earl Cureton – 1996-97, 9 g, 0.0 ws
148. Dwight Byucks – 2013-14, 14 g, 0.0 ws
147. Sean Marks – 1998-00, 14 g, 0.0 ws; part of the Marcus Camby trade
146. Haywoode Workman – 2000, 13 g, 0.0 ws; is an active NBA referee, and the first former NBA player to become a ref
145. Solomon Alabi – 2010-12, 26 g, 0.0 ws
144. Jason Kapono – 2007-09, 161 g, 2.7 ws; led the NBA with a .483 three-point shooting percentage in 2007-08
143. Anthony Carter – 2011-12, 24 g, 0 ws
142. Carlos Arroyo – 2001, 17 g, 0.0 ws

141-MAGLOIRE

Jamaal Magloire (2011–12, 34 g, -0.2 ws) was the first Canadian player to play for a Canadian NBA team, which in some way, is important. That gets him some points. His stint was not spectacular, joining the Raptors well after he was an impactful NBA player. Jamaal Magloire should be remembered by Canadian hoops fans but not for his short time as a Raptors big man. Retiring as a Toronto Raptor after a 12-year career and one All-Star selection, he is now currently employed by the team as a coach, consultant and ambassador.

140. Peja Stojaković – 2010-11, 2 g, 0.1 ws
139. Omar Cook – 2005-06, 5 g, 0.1 ws
138. Lloyd Daniels – 1997-98, 6 g, 0.1 ws
137. Nate Huffman – 2002-03, 7 g, 0.1 ws
136. Mengke Bateer – 2003-04, 7 g, 0.1 ws
135. Derrick Dial – 2001-02, 7 g, 0.1 ws
134. Sebastien Telfair – 2013, 13 g, 0.1 ws
133. Rod Strickland – 2004, 15 g, 0.1 ws
132. P.J. Tucker – 2006-07, 17 g, 0.1 ws
131. Greg Stiemsma – 2014-15, 17 g, 0.1 ws

130. Uroš Slokar – 2006-07, 20 g, 0.1 ws; scored a career-high 18 points in final NBA game
129. Martin Lewis – 1996-97, 25 g, 0.1 ws
128. Donald Whiteside – 1996-97, 27 g, 0.1 ws
127. John Long – 1996-97, 32 g, 0.1 ws; came back after five years off from the NBA in 96-97!
126. Hubert Davis – 1996-97, 36 g, 0.1 ws; only player named Hubert in NBA history
125. Aaron Williams – 2004-05, 37 g, 0.1 ws
124. Quincy Douby – 2009, 7 g, 0.2 ws
123. Luke Jackson – 2007, 10 g, 0.2 ws
122. David Andersen – 2010, 11 g, 0.2 ws
121. Primož Brezec – 2009-10, 13 g, 0.2 ws

120. Dominic McGuire – 2012, 15 g, 0.2 ws; has played for 7 teams in 6 seasons
119. Ben Uzoh – 2012, 16 g, 0.2 ws
118. Julyan Stone – 2013-14, 21 g, 0.2 ws
117. Roger Mason – 2003-04, 23 g, 0.2 ws
116. Patrick O’Bryant – 2009-10, 24 g, 0.2 ws; is apparently nicknamed “Notorious POB”
115. Alexis Ajinça – 2011, 24 g, 0.2 ws
114. Robert Archibald – 2004, 30 g, 0.2 ws
113. Pops Mensah-Bonsu – 2009 & 2009-10, 35 g, 0.2 ws
112. Acie Earl – 1995-97, 80 g, 0.2 ws
111. Gary Trent – 1998, 13 g, 0.3 ws; nicknamed “Shaq of the MAC”

110. Corie Blount – 2004, 16 g, 0.4 ws
109. Kornel David – 2000-01, 17 g, 0.3 ws
108. Nando de Colo – 2014, 21 g, 0.4 ws
107. Landry Fields – 2012-15, 107 g, 1.8 ws
106. Chauncey Billups – 1998, 29 g, 0.4 ws; key part of the trade that landed the pick Toronto used for Morris Peterson (#3)
105. Marcus Banks – 2009-10, 31, 0.4 ws
104. Will Solomon – 2008-09, 39 g, 0.4 ws
103. Eric Montross – 2001-02, 61 g, 0.3 ws; the other player in the deal that brought the Junkyard Dog (#6) to Toronto
102. Antoine Wright – 2009-10, 67 g, 0.3 ws
101. Michael Curry – 2003-04, 70 g, 0.3 ws

100. Darrick Martin – 2005-08, 88 g, 0.4 ws
99. Eric Williams – 2004-06, 62 g, 0.5 ws
98. Julian Wright – 2010-11, 52 g, 0.6 ws
97. Tony Massenburg – 1995-96, 24 g, 0.8 ws; started for both Toronto and Vancouver, taken with 3rd pick in 1995 Expansion Draft
96. Mamadou N’Diaye – 2001-03, 30 g, 0.8 ws
95. Maceo Boston – 2003 & 2007-08, 31 g, 0.8 ws
94. Fred Jones – 2006-07, 39 g, 0.8 ws
93. Corliss Williamson – 2000-01, 42 g, 0.8 ws
92. Jérôme Moïso – 2003-04, 43 g, 0.8 ws
91. Joey Dorsey – 2010-11, 43 g, 0.8 ws

90. Gary Forbes – 2011-12, 48 g, 0.8 ws
89. Willie Anderson – 1995-96, 49 g, 0.9 ws
88. Pape Sow – 2004-07, 76 g, 0.8 ws
87. Lamond Murray – 2003-05, 95 g, 0.9 ws; drafted 7th overall in 1994, ahead of Eddie Jones and Jalen Rose
86. Sonny Weems – 2009-11, 128 g, 0.9 ws; real name: Clarence Weems
85. John Salley – 1995-96, 25 g, 0.4 ws; won 2 NBA championships with Chuck Daly and the “Bad Boy” Detroit Pistons (1989 & 1990), a second with one with Phil Jackson and Michael Jordan (1996) and another Jackson, Shaq and Kobe (2000), while also one of only 2 NBA players (alongside Tim Duncan) to win titles spanning 3 decades; played himself in the 1998 Whoopi Goldberg film Eddie

84-RUDYGAY

For the 51 games that Rudy Gay (2013, 51 g, 1.9 ws) played as a Toronto Raptor, he was their offense. The high-profile 2013 signing shot a career low .411 as a Raptor before Masai Ujiri came to town and promptly traded him to the Kings. Had this relationship lasted a Bargnani amount of time the fallout of his poor shot selection and ball dominance could have become something a lot worse. Raptors fans should look back on Rudy Gay as a quick, flirtatious relationship that didn’t work out. But you had fun. He had his issues. He was a good stand-in during that brief existential crisis. And he definitely helped ya get over that Bargnani asshole. Now that Toronto has landed with someone better we can all feel good about this, right? (Rudy, hope you’re doing alright in Sactown.) — Travis Nicholson

83. Jimmy King – 1995-96, 62 g, 0.0
82. Lonny Baxter – 2003-04, 36 g, 1.0 ws
81. Jelani McCoy – 2002-03, 67 g, 1.0 ws

80. Ed Pinckney – 1995-96, 134 g, 2.5 ws
79. Michael Stewart – 1998-02, 121 g, 1.1 ws
78. Jermaine O’Neal – 2008-09, 41 g, 1.4 ws
77. John Lucas III – 2012-13, 63 g, 1.1 ws; son of former NBA coach John Lucas II
76. John Salmons – 2013-14, 60 g, 1.4 ws
75. Kris Humphries – 2006-09, 159 g, 4 ws; in three seasons in Toronto he started only 2 games
74. Mickaël Piétrus – 2012-13, 19 g, 0.0 ws; nicknamed “Air France”; “Pietrus should be higher based on that one interview where he danced” – Mitch Orsatti
73. Juan Dixon – 2007-08, 62 g, 1.1 ws
72. Loren Woods – 2004-06, 72 g, 1.1 ws
71. John Thomas – 1998-00, 115 g, 1.9 ws

70. Linas Kleiza – 2010-13, 108 g, 1,3 ws
69. Aaron Gray – 2011-13, 95 g, 1.9 ws; did not attempt a single three-point shot while a Raptor
68. Michael Bradley – 2001-04, 98 g, 1.6 ws; drafted over Gerald Wallace, Zach Randolph and Jason Collins
67. Chris Childs – 2001-02, 95 g, 1.3 ws
66. Milt Palacio – 2003-05, 139 g, 1.2 ws
65. Steve Novak – 2013-14, 54 g, 1.4 ws
64. Marco Belinelli – 2009-10, 66 g, 1.2 ws
63. Žan Tabak – 1995-98, 119 g, 1.0 ws
62. Clifford Rozier – 1996-97, 41 g, 1.6 ws
61. Shawn Respert – 1997-98, 74 g, 1.7 ws

60. Quincy Acy – 2012-13, 36 g, 1.4 ws
59. Tyler Hansbrough – 2013-15, 138 g, 6.5 ws; is nicknamed “Psycho T”
58. Jarret Jack – 2009-10, 95 g, 4.8 ws
57. Reggie Slater – 1996-99, 134 g, 2.5 ws
56. John Wallace – 1997-99, 130 g, 2.6 ws
55. Charlie Villanueva – 2005-06, 81 g, 3.9 ws; has Alopecia universalis and cannot grow hair; it should be become public knowledge that Mark Milner used to own a Charlie Villanueva jersey
54. Alvin Robertson – 1995-96, 77 g, 2.8 ws; played his last season in Toronto after missing 2 years with a back injury
53. Carlos Rogers – 1995-98, 130 g, 5.4 ws
52. Shawn Marion – 2009, 27 g, 1.6 ws
51. Voshon Lenard – 2002-03, 63 g, 2.2 ws

50. Mark Jackson – 2000-01, 54 g, 4.7 ws

49-HAKEEM

Hakeem Olajuwon (2001-02, 61 g, 2.1 ws) graced the Raptors with his presence, playing one season in Toronto before retiring. His numbers suggest Hakeem wasn’t The Dream we knew in Houston, but reasonably mobile and definitely not broken. Putting an NBA legend in the top 50 of this list seems like a fine idea. — Travis Nicholson

48. Carlos Delfino – 2007-08, 82 g, 4 ws; played in every game of his lone Raptors season
47. Alan Anderson – 2012-13, 82 g, 1.9 ws
46. Jamario Moon – 2007-09, 132 g, 9.1 ws; tried, and failed, to dunk from foul line in 2008 Dunk Contest
45. Joey Graham – 2005-09, 275 g, 6.7 ws
44. Chuck Hayes – 2013-15, 74 g, 1.5 ws
43. Reggie Evans – 2009-11, 58 g, 1.5 ws; once grabbed Chris Kaman’s balls, prompting a legendary Inside the NBA segment
42. Kevin Willis – 1998-01, 156 g, 6.4 ws;
41. Jerryd Bayless – 2010-12, 91 g, 3.8 ws; scored a career-high 31 points as a Raptor against Detroit on Dec. 11, 2010

40. Popeye Jones – 1996-98, 93 g, 4.5 ws; father of NHL player Seth Jones
39. Keon Clark – 2001-02, 127 g, 8.8 ws; averaged 13.4 point-per-game for Toronto in the 2002 playoffs
38. Terrence Ross – 2012-, 236 g, 7.5 ws; scored 51 points that one time and dunks real good
37. Jorge Garbajosa – 2006-08, 74 g, 3 ws; only played two NBA seasons, both with Toronto
36. Radoslav Nesterovič – 2006-08 & 2009-10, 193 g, 8.8 ws; AKA ROSHO
35. T.J. Ford – 2006-08, 126 g, 7.5 ws
34. Leandro Barbosa – 2010-12, 100 g, 2.5 ws
33. Muggsy Bogues – 1999-01, 83 g, 3.6 ws; only 5’3″, he finished a 14-year career in Toronto; is the reason no one ever gets to use their height as an excuse in basketball
32. Rafer Alston – 2002-03 & 2004-05, 127 g, 6.7 ws; AKA “Skip To My Lou”, legend of streetball and And1 MixTape Tours, impossible handles and impossible to coach, would sometimes decide to indiscriminately not pass the ball to Jalen Rose amongst other follies
31. Matt Bonner – 2004-06, 160 g, 8.3 ws; his nickname “Red Rocket” is taken from Toronto’s TTC transit system

30. Donyell Marshall – 2003-05, 131 g, 15.8 ws
29. Anthony Parker – 2006-09, 235 g, 16.1 ws; hit game-winning shot in Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv’s 2005 win against Toronto
28. Dee Brown – 1998-00, 118 g, 5.3 ws
27. Dell Curry – 1999-02, 194 g, 5.4 ws; grandfather of Riley Curry
26. Mike James – 2005-06, 79 g, 7.6 ws; had a career-best .583 True Shooting percentage as a Raptor in 2005-06

25-LOUWILL

Lou Williams (2014-15, 80 g, 6.6 ws) won Sixth Man of the Year in 2014/15 and also won over the charm of Raptor fans. Maybe it was his two girlfriends, or maybe his terribly ineffective “Lou for one” end of quarter possessions that happened to work at the beginning of the season in front of the crowds at the ACC. But Lou delivered when he wasn’t forcing it before the buzzer, filling in for offense when Lowry and DeRozan weren’t bringing any in the backcourt for a brief, terrifying stretch. Toronto took what was considered a gamble on Williams, who was recovering from a torn ACL and made it look like safe, house money. Lou Williams did exactly what a team should expect when they sign up for the services of Lou Williams, and the Raps needed it badly. — Travis Nicholson

24. Greivis Vásquez – 2013-15, 143 g, 5.4 ws
23. Oliver Miller – 1995-96 & 1997-98, 159 g, 5.6 ws
22. Walt Williams – 1996-98, 101 g, 6.2 ws
21. Tracy Murray – 1996-98, 160 g, 6.3 ws

20. Patrick Patterson – 2013-, 129 g, 9.6 ws
19. Jonas Valančiūnas – 2012-, 223 g, 18.9 ws
18. Ed Davis – 2010-13, 176 g, 11.1 ws; drafted 10th overall in 2010, over Eric Bledsoe and Patrick Patterson
17. James Johnson – 2011-12 & 2014-, 157 g, 7.3 ws; that dunk!
16. Antonio Davis – 1999-2003 & 2006, 310 g, 22.8 ws
15. Charles Oakley – 1998-01, 208 g, 8.1 ws
14. Jalen Rose – 2003-06, 177 g, 7.2 ws; currently gives the people what they want as a commentator on Grantland and ESPN
13. Marcus Camby – 1996-98, 126 g, 4.7 ws; picked 2nd by the Raptors in the NBA Draft
12. José Calderón – 2005-13, 525 g, 41.5 ws
11. Doug Christie – 1996-00, 314 g, 21.1 ws

10-McGRADY

Tracy McGrady (1997-00, 192 g, 11.9 ws) was faced with the decision to continue play alongside his cousin Vince Carter fifteen years too early. If we’re talking in the uncertain realm of “what if”, McGrady choosing to escape “the shadow” of Carter’s stardom cements his legacy as the ultimate could have been in franchise history. He is unmistakably part of the early mythology of the Toronto Raptors, for better or for worse. — Mitch Orsatti

9. Kyle Lowry – 2012-, 217 g, 24.4 ws
8. DeMar DeRozan – 2009-, 443 g, 25.5 ws
7. Alvin Williams – 1998-06, 417 g, 20.4 ws
6. Jerome Williams – 2001-03, 180 g, 12.7 ws; an all-time fan-favourite, nicknamed Junkyard Dog, still active with the Raptors franchise and community

5-AMIR

Amir Johnson (2009-15, 525 g, 41.5 ws) is the perfect athlete for Toronto: gritty, angry and tenacious. Toronto and Amir grew up together since arriving from Detroit in 2009, and in six years he became the heart and soul of the Raptors locker room. The affection from the people of Toronto grew and grew and a relationship formed, only partly because he remained on the squad during waves and waves of roster turnover but also because he did all of the small integral things a basketball team needs. He was one of Toronto’s most tenured and beloved athletes before departing for Boston at the end of last season, as popular as pre-2015 Joey Bautista and more popular than any single Maple Leaf. His work ethic and outspoken advocacy for the city made him an informal ambassador of the Six. Watching him hustle, set picks and grab important rebounds allowed Raps fans to learn to cheer for offensive rebounds the same way Leafs fans do for a successful penalty kill. (His 1524 personal fouls for the Raptors is more than any other player.) A Raptors team without Amir Johnson is a very different thing from what it used to be. — Travis Nicholson

4-DAMON

Damon Stoudamire (1995-98, 200 g, 15 ws) is the very first Toronto Raptor. Like, ever. History starts with him, and since then the Raptors have had a contentious and always fiesty relationship with their point guards. (Maybe it has something to do with the fact that they were founded in part by a possible psychopath who excelled at that particular position.) In that inaugural season, Stoudamire set the tone for so many other point guards that Toronto basketball fans would live and die by on a nightly basis. Winning Rookie of the Year in 1996, playing 41 minutes per games (1st by any Raptors by 3.5 minutes played), he scored more impossible baskets against impossible odds than he should have been allowed to, considering he was a rookie point guard running a pristine, shiny new NBA team. — Travis Nicholson

3-MOPETE

Morris Peterson (2000-07, 542 g, 30.5 ws) is the all-time games played leader for the Toronto Raptors. More than just the amount of times he has taken the floor for the team, though, Mo Pete felt like the first tenured Raptor to truly make Toronto his home. It seemed he was as heartbroken as Toronto was when Vince exited town like he did. His relationship between his team and the city seemed mutual, being one of the earliest NBA colonizers of Toronto where many would follow. Respect is due where respect is due. — Travis Nicholson

2-VINCE

The consensus on Vince Carter (1998-04, 403 g, 47.7 ws) and his place on this list was contentious. To make this list we created two collaborative spreadsheets, settled on a casual use of WinShares to make the first list and then made countless iterations from the original. It was Vince’s strongest critic among our crew that suggested he place second. He did get first place votes. Carter earned the love and admiration of Raptors fans like no other player had before — and that love was torn apart by a lack of effort, the speculation of fake injuries coupled with the divisive ire of Toronto basketball fans. In the end, an insidious optimism wins out. He might be the most explosive dunker in basketball history and he earned that status wearing a Raptors uniform. There is little we could agree on other than how great those great moments were. Aside from our #1, no one else has numbers like this first Raptors superstar: 1st in points per game (23.4), 2nd in points scored (9420), 8th in games played (403), 3rd in minutes played (15114), 2nd in minutes per game (37.5). But the way he eviscerated that rim with fluidity, elegance and anger is the reason Vincent Lamar Carter is a Raptors legend. — Travis Nicholson

1-BOSH

Chris Bosh (2003-10, 509 g, 61.8 ws) is the all-time Raptors leader in points, rebounds and blocks. Is Bosh better than Carter? Maybe not in a one-on-one game, but that’s hardly the point. Bosh didn’t just carry his teams like Carter did, he did it with a lesser surrounding cast: Bargnani, Nesterovic, Anthony Parker… take a look at this list. He didn’t win any dunk contests, but he did shoot a DVD here and was arguably the most hip Raptor ever, too. — Mark Milner
 
When Chris Bosh departed Toronto, there was no doubt that he had given he is all for the this franchise. He owns all of the important records. People can argue if Vince left graciously, but no one questions Bosh and no one should. Bosh humbled Toronto fans by fighting through 500+ games for a franchise steering itself in a bunch of different directions, being the only stable thing Raptors fans could look toward. (Bonus: he even kind of looks like a Raptor.) The Grizzlies left Canada in 2001 because they lacked a lot of things, most notably a superstar player and an audience willing to support a terrible team. Here was this superstar, balling his god damn ass off, flicking away Vince Carter’s shadow as his dreads whipped into the lane for a putback dunk. Chris Bosh was the hinge between hope and despair for a large chunk of Raptors’ history, he was their shred of respectability when they had little, and without him it’s possible the Raptors aren’t around at all. — Travis Nicholson

last updated: October 26, 2015   source: Basketball-Reference.com

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is currently made up of Travis Nicholson, Mitch Orsatti and Mark Milner. Many collaborative articles can be found here, or at the individual author archives linked above.

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